What’s New?

You might have noticed that I am blogging less often as I used to. It’s not that I have nothing to say or write about. And it’s definitely not that I don’t want to keep blogging. I do. Life is simply keeping me very busy these days.

But here are the good news: I keep on photographing. That’s why I recently updated most of my photo galleries on this site and you are welcome to have a look at what I’ve been up to in 2016 and at the beginning of this year.

I updated Landscapes, Weather, Nature, Animals, People and Urban to include photos from France, Germany, Spain and the Netherlands.

Here are a few of my personal favorites:

We are planning to travel quite a bit in 2017. New and old destinations are on our list and I promise that you will be able to read about our adventures over here 🌋🏕️🏖️🏜️🏙️

Photo Essay: Queensland, Australia

As we travelled from Cairns to Brisbane (North to South) we discovered that Queensland is much more than sunny beaches, surfers and adventure parks. There are also endless stretches of straight boring roads, millions of acres of sugar cane and in between — these treasures…

If you like this post you might also like Photo Essay: Northern Territory, Australia

Exploring A Tiny Part Of The Great Barrier Reef With The GoPro

Snorkeling the Outer Reef of Cairns gave us a tiny glimpse into an uncomparable underwater universe. Our goal that day was to see a sea turtle; we were lucky enough to swim with one. We hope to be back one day!

Please excuse the camera shake. We actually went out several kilometres to get to the Outer Reef. Big waves were rolling in right behind the corals, making quiet snorkeling almost impossible ;)

If you like this post you might also like Exploring Rarotonga’s Lagoon With The GoPro

Photo Essay: Northern Territory, Australia

How could I ever squeeze the words “freezing”, “dry”, “red”, “traditional”, “heat”, “crocodile”, “billabong”, “blue” and “bushfire” into one photo essay description without writing a novel? You’re right, I can’t. So let me just briefly discuss some weather phenomenons of the Northern Territory, which create a huge natural variety and diversity on the 1,800 kilometres between Australia’s tropical North and the continent’s arid centre.

During our first week in the Red Centre — around Alice Springs — we didn’t see a single cloud. Unfortunately, that clear blue sky over the desert didn’t offer much protection when temperatures dropped from comfortable 20°C over the day to uncomfortable 0°C at night. Camping fun!

That said, taking the plane to Darwin to spend our second week in the Northern Territory’s tropical North sounded like the greatest thing since sliced bread. Due to the wet season, when tropical cyclones and monsoons reign the northern top end, the Darwin region gets 9 times more rain each year than the central desert. While it didn’t rain during our stay (July = dry season), we got to see some clouds up north; and we were finally back to comfortable camping temperatures at night.

Let’s have a look at how these weather differences influence(d) the land, nature and animals of the Northern Territory.

If you like this article you might also want to check out my:

Perfect Faith

muriwai-gannet-colony-auckland-newzealand

The reason birds can fly and we can’t is simply because they have perfect faith, for to have faith is to have wings.
~J.M. Barrie, The Little White Bird

Photo details (please click on the image for best quality):
Canon EOS 60D, 70mm, ISO 320, F9, 1/800 sec., no filter, no flash.
Location: Muriwai Gannet Colony, Auckland, New Zealand.

If you like this post please have a look at more Wise Words And Quotes In Images

Weekend Wanderings: Rare Birds, Dinos, And Hungry Eels

New Zealand’s National Wildlife Centre, Pukaha Mount Bruce, is a place where I could easily spend a few hours.

Double rainbow over Mt Bruce Nature Reserve New Zealand

Perfect welcome ceremony at Pukaha Mount Bruce (not sure they do that every day though ;) )

White New Zealand Kiwi Bird Manukura

While the Centre is famous among tourists for having a rare white kiwi – Manukura – it was the first place in New Zealand where I had the chance to see a kokako (after 3.5 years in the country).

Rare Bird Kokako Mt Bruce New Zealand

Kokakos are native birds who have different songs (“dialects”) depending on where they live. They are extremely endangered; only 40 of them are living wild in the Pukaha forest!

New Zealand Tuatara Dinosaur

Tuataras – “living fossils” that were already around during the age of the disonsaurs – are always nice to observe. Though I wasn’t 100% sure who was actually observing whom…

Mt Bruce New Zealand Eel feeding

The main attraction at Pukaha Mount Bruce are the daily eel feeding sessions. Volunteers are very welcome!

Mt Bruce New Zealand Eel feeding

Beside enjoying some gentle strokes, the Pukaha longfin eels want to be fed with a silver spoon.

Mt Bruce New Zealand Eel feeding

Their diet: Veggies with bacon and a couple of mice for dessert. Yummi!

Beside nature reserves like Pukaha Mount Bruce, community driven projects for bird recovery and pest control are a popular method to protect New Zealand’s native tuataras and endangered bird species like kiwis and kokakos.

Listen to the sound of the video below to get an impression of how a New Zealand forest can sound like thanks to successful pest control management and animal protection. I’m loving it!

If you like this post you might also like That Time I Touched A Kiwi, Played With A Pukeko And Talked To A Tui

Hermit Crab Shell Change

Hermit crabs are usually extremely shy and patient creatures, not performing any big acts in front of an audience.

However, the crab in my video below was changing from a very perforated shell into a less draughty home. Urgent matters can’t wait I guess!

I filmed this short “crab-changes-shell” movie while stumbling out of Rarotonga’s lagoon with my GoPro. I was actually quite close, but the camera’s fisheye lens makes it look like I’m far away. Just watch the video twice in case of doubt ;)

If you like this post you might also like Exploring Rarotonga’s Lagoon With The GoPro